Honeypot in Cyber Security

What is a Honeypot in Cyber Security?

A honeypot is a cybersecurity technique that involves setting up a decoy system or network with the purpose of attracting and detecting hackers and other cyber attackers. The honeypot appears to be a legitimate target, but in reality, it is a trap that is designed to gather information about the tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs) used by attackers.

How does Honeypot Work?

Honeypots work by luring attackers into a system that appears to be a legitimate target, but is actually a trap. When an attacker interacts with the honeypot, the system captures information about the attacker's methods, such as the IP address, tools and techniques used, and the specific actions taken. This information can then be used to improve security measures and better protect real systems and networks from future attacks.

Types of Honeypots

Honeypots can be classified on the basis of their deployment and their level of involvement.

On the basis of deployment, honeypots can be classified as:

1. Production honeypots

These honeypots are deployed in a production environment and simulate real systems and services that an organization might use. They are often used to detect attacks against specific systems or services, such as web servers or email servers.

2. Research honeypots

These honeypots are designed to be used by researchers and security professionals to gather data about attacks and attackers. They are often deployed in a controlled environment and can be customized to simulate different types of systems and services.

Based on the level of involvement, honeypots can be classified as:

1. High-interaction honeypots

These honeypots fully emulate real systems and services, giving attackers the impression that they are interacting with a legitimate system. High-interaction honeypots are more difficult to set up and maintain, but they can provide more detailed information about attackers and their methods.

2. Low-interaction honeypots

These honeypots simulate only the most common protocols and services, such as HTTP or FTP. They are easier to set up and maintain, but provide less detailed information about attackers.

3. Pure honeypots

A pure honeypot is a type of honeypot that is designed to be completely passive, meaning it does not interact with attackers in any way. It is a decoy system or network that is set up to attract and detect attacks, without taking any active measures to prevent or respond to them.

Honeypot Softwares

  1. Honeyd:
    Honeyd is a low-interaction honeypot that simulates a variety of different systems and services. It is easy to set up and is often used for research and education purposes.

  2. Kippo:
    Kippo is a high-interaction honeypot that emulates an SSH server. It captures information about attackers, including their usernames, passwords, and commands used.

  3. Dionaea:
    Dionaea is a high-interaction honeypot that is designed to capture malware samples and gather information about attackers. It supports a wide range of protocols and services, including HTTP, FTP, and SMB.

  4. Cowrie:
    Cowrie is a high-interaction honeypot that emulates a Telnet or SSH server. It captures information about attackers, including their usernames, passwords, and commands used.

Honeypots can be used in a variety of different contexts, including in research, as a tool for training security personnel, and as part of an organization's overall cybersecurity strategy.


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